ASVCP Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient, John Harvey - November, 2007

John HarveyDr. John W. Harvey began his career in 1974 as an Assistant Professor at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. For 33 years he has been the cornerstone of veterinary clinical pathology at the University of Florida. He taught basic hematology and clinical pathology since the first veterinary class was admitted in 1976 and has been a staff clinical pathologist since the UF Veterinary Medical Center opened in 1977. Dr. Harvey is currently Professor and Chair of the Department of Physiological Sciences and Chief of the Clinical Pathology Service. He served as department chair since 1995.

Dr. Harvey received his DVM from Kansas State University in 1970, at which time he traveled to the University of California-Davis and enrolled as a PhD student. At UC Davis he trained with the masters, Oscar Schalm and Jerry Kaneko, who had major impacts on his career. However, it is obvious that Dr. Harvey has traversed his own career path and made significant contributions along the way. During his tenure at the University of Florida, he trained 21 clinical pathologists, taught countless numbers of veterinary students and provided the veterinary community, and specifically veterinary clinical pathologists, with three texts of vital importance, Clinical Biochemistry of Domestic Animals (Kaneko, Harvey, Bruss), Veterinary Laboratory Medicine (Meyer and Harvey), and Atlas of Veterinary Hematology: Blood and Bone Marrow of Domestic Animals (Harvey). His contributions in the field of veterinary hematology are numerous, particularly in the areas of inherited red cell metabolic diseases and hemoparasites. Dr. Harvey is an internationally recognized expert having published over 140 journal articles and book chapters and presented over 210 scientific and continuing education talks and seminars in the area of veterinary hematology.

Some of Dr. Harvey's significant contributions include, but are not limited to, his pioneering work with Mycoplasma haemofelis and Cytauxzoon felis infection in cats and studies involving canine infectious agents such as Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia canis, Leishmania donovani, and Anaplasma platys (a rickettsial parasite of dog platelets that Dr. Harvey discovered and named). Another longstanding area of interest of Dr. Harvey's has been inherited defects of erythrocyte metabolism. This has resulted from in-depth studies of clinical cases of pyruvate kinase deficiency in dogs, methemoglobin reductase deficiency in dogs and cats, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in horses, and flavin adenine dinucleotide deficiency in horses. He also conducted extensive experimental studies on erythrocytes and muscles from adult and neonatal phosphofructokinase-deficient dogs. Dr. Harvey discovered or co-discovered three of these inherited erythrocyte defects.

For his significant contributions to teaching and scholarly activity, Dr. Harvey received the University of Florida Norden Distinguished Teacher Award, the CL Davis Foundation Journal Scholarship Award, the Daniels Pharmaceuticals Senior Clinical Investigator Award, Alumni Recognition Award from the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, and the Award for Outstanding Contribution to Animal Clinical Chemistry, Division of Animal Clinical Chemistry, American Association for Clinical Chemistry. Dr. Harvey has also served as President of the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and President of the International Society of Animal Clinical Biochemistry.

However, the magnitude of Dr. Harvey's professional accomplishments pale in comparison to his personal qualities. He is respected by his colleagues and students because he is a man of honor and integrity. He is uncommonly fair when dealing with his faculty; slow to blame and quick to forgive. He has an uncanny ability to resolve difficult situations to the satisfaction of all because his colleagues know that his motivations are always unselfish. He is a great teacher because he continues to be a student and a great leader because he continues to be a servant. He strained with the masters, and in every sense of the word, he has become one.